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Avro 504
 
   


General Historic Data
A.V. Roe designed the AVRO 504 in 1913. At the time he hoped to sell 6 aircraft. When the factory stopped manufacturing in 1932, over 10,000 had been built. Most of them were 2 seater trainer aircraft used during World War I. After the war they were modified to seat 3 people. The AVRO 504 became the post-war years' most popular aircraft at flying circuses and air displays. Sightseeing flights were also popular at that time. Many alterations were made and several types of rotary engines were used. The final version, the 504N, had a fuselage made of steel tubes.

The Avro 504 was renowned as a very stable and reliable aircraft.

Historical Data from Norway
Two Avro 504s were acquired for training purposes in 1919.The engines were originally 80 hp rotary Gnomes, but due to difficulties in getting hold of spare parts, they were exchanged for 90 hp Swedish Thulin engines. In 1920 the Army Air Force ordered 5 Bristol F2 fighter aircraft and two new AVRO 504s as trainer aircraft. The latter were equipped with 100 hp Dayak engines. This was an unfortunate combination, however, as both speed and maximum altitude (1000m) proved to be a step backwards compared to earlier versions.

The Army Air Force received a fifth AVRO 504 as a gift from Roald Amundsen, but on its maiden test flight from Kjeller aerodrome it had engine trouble and plummeted to the ground from an altitude of 100 metres, killing both pilots. The AVRO 504 was in active service in the Army Air Force until 1930.
TEKNISKE DATA
LENGDE: 8,8 m
VINGESPENN: 10,9 m
HØYDE: 3,2 m
MAKS. VEKT: 830 kg
MAKS. HASTIGHET: 140 km/t
MAKS. HØYDE: 4500 m
REKKEVIDDE: 330 km
MOTOR: 1 Dayak, 100
ANDRE OPPLYSNINGER:
 


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