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AERODYNAMICS


 
Anyone who has cycled against the wind is aware that there is force in the flow of air. Objects can be blown into the air by the wind, and even the roofs of houses can take off and fly through the air. Objects that move in relation to static air are also affected by the force. The birds have learned how to exploit this. 

Aerodynamics is the study of force and movement in the flow of air. 

How can aircraft fly and be controlled?
The Aerodynamics Section consists of 3 small wind tunnels together with user tasks and instructions. Visitors can carry out simple aerodynamic experiments that help explain elevation, drag and control of the aircraft.

 
Elevation 
The shape of a curved wing causes the airspeed to be greater above the wing than below it. This leads to reduced pressure above the wing, because the molecules of air have to move further and therefore there will be fewer molecules per unit of length. When the wing is slanted, we experience an increase in pressure underneath. Lower pressure above the wing, i.e. suction, in addition to increased pressure beneath
the wing, generate elevation.

Drag
Similar to the way you meet resistance when cycling, an aircraft will also meet resistance (drag) when moving through the air. This drag has to be overcome in order to allow the aircraft to take off and move forward. 
Drag depends on the size and shape of the object in question. In the wind tunnel, you can study the drag (air resistance) on two differently shaped aircraft .

Controlled flight

Aircraft are steered (controlled) by rudders. Given that the aircraft must be controllable on three axes, then three types of rudder are required: an elevator, a (sideways) rudder and an aileron. The elevator (for movements up and down) is located at the horizontal part of the tailplane. The rudder (for sideways movement) is located on the vertical part of the tail. The ailerons, which are used to tip the aircraft from one side to another, are located outermost at the back of the wings. They are connected in such a way that they move in opposite directions, up and down.


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