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4.2 Summary of interviews

Jenny Johansen, Hillesøy, told journalist Per Eliassen that in the spring of 1928 she
and her sister Kaspara had seen an aircraft for the first time. They were at
Værholmen, Hillesøy, looking for goats when they saw an aircraft in the sea. She
was reasonably sure that it was the day that Amundsen disappeared. It took the
sisters half an hour to return home and when they arrived they told the men on
the farm what they had seen. When they went to look, the aircraft had
disappeared. The girls were told to keep quiet about what they had seen. 

After this had been published in the newspapers last year, Lovise Trondsen
appeared on the scene. She had also seen her first aircraft in the spring of 1928,
and thought it was Amundsen she had seen, although she could not be completely
sure. She was working at Vasstrand at the time. One night they were woken up by
the local teacher who came running to tell them that an aircraft had come flying out
of the Kattfjorden. Lovise stood looking through the attic window and saw the
aircraft fly out of the fjord at low altitude past the beacon at Vasstrandnes.
The farmer later said he had found a pontoon from the “Latham” and that he had
hidden it in the boathouse.
 
Anna Sofie Hansen, Kaldfjord, could confirm that in the autumn of 1928 she and
some other school children had found a light coloured cylinder on the shore at
Skittenelv. The cylinder was marked with the word “Latham.” Even though the name
was spelled incorrectly, both the children and the teacher believed it to originate
from Amundsen’s accident.

All of these events occurred at a time when contacting the newspapers or
authorities was looked upon in a completely different light than is the case today.




  
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