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The rudder of Tiger Moth "143" Back in Bodø!

 
The rudder of Tiger Moth "143" is back in Bodø. Last time was back in august 1933 when two Tiger Moths arrived from Værnes Airfield close to Trondheim. 

This was the first landing of land- based aircrafts done in Bodø. The two Tiger Moths were "141" and "143" flown by capt Øen and 2nd. Lt. Ystgård. As passengers were the observer Lt. Holm and the technician 2.Lt. Stav. The results of this flight were to have far reaching consequences for the planning of military air operations in the north of Norway. After a short landing at Mosjøen the two airplanes landed just outside Bodø close to 1700 hrs in the evening of august 1st. The return flight were planned two days later but this was not to be! August 3rd they again took off but continued on a northerly course.
In the end they reached Alta on their flight up north! On their return flight they again landed at Bodø on the 8th. of august.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 




The rudder of Tiger Moth "143"


Due to bad weather they had to return again to Bodø after trying to fly further south. The weather did not improve until august 10th. Early in the day on august 11th they were back at Værnes Airfield.

Tiger Moth "143" was used in the Værnes area until 19th. of july 1934. Again 2.Lt. Ystgård together with the observer Lt. Hære were on a flight in the vincinity of Trondheim. The time were around 1130 when the Tiger Moth was seen spiralling down and finally crashing close to Huldrevollen in the Meråker mountains. Because of lack of roads in the area and a rather rugged terrain, they were not rescued until more than 24 hours later. Both of the aviators recovered in a short time. The airplane was scrapped. Only the engine was recovered. The rest of the Tiger Moth was at a later date taken out on the frozen lake nearby. When the spring arrived and the ice broke up, the remains were sinking to the bottom of the lake. Only the rudder remained. This was given as a thank you to the owners of Huldrevollen for their help in the recovery operation. The pilot 2.Lt. Ystgård was later married to the dairy-maid employed at Huldrevollen.


The rudder remained at Huldrevollen. Just recently two pilots of the Widerøes Airline, Klas Gjølmesli and Erik Bjørkum got to know about the rudder. They took contact with the now owner of Huldrevollen, Ms. Mette Ystgaard now living in Oslo. She donated the rudder to the Norwegian Aviation Museum where it will be displayed soon in the military part of the Norsk Luftfartssenter. On behalf of Norsk Luftfartsmuseum
I will say a great THANK YOU to the donor and the "collectors" for this fine piece of aviation history gifted to us.


After landing in Bodø

Still containing the original canvas, this rudder is also valuable for its colours and markings, one of the few original parts left from the prewar era.

Facts about Tiger Moth "143":


After the crash at Huldrevollen.


Built on license by the Norwegian Army Aviation Factory at Kjeller. 

One of ten in the first series of airplanes. 

Type: DH.82. First Unit: Kjeller Aviation Factory 
30.06.33. 

Transferred Værnes: 10.07.33.

Hours at 30.06.33.: 5 Hrs.

Hours flown 1933: 75 Hrs.

Hours flown 1934: 85 Hrs.

Crashed: 19.07.34.